10 Irritating Airline Up-charges You Actually Want to Pay

Last Updated on December 16, 2018

10 Irritating Airline Up-charges You Actually Want to Pay© Business Insider

The booking process feels like it includes more and more add-on options every time you plan a new trip, and in case you’ve never taken advantage of any of them, you may be asking yourself whether they’re actually worth the cash.

But really, are there fees worth paying? Looking at various lists of airline fees and upgrades, we found some that you might actually want to pay.

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EXIT ROW SEATING

EXIT ROW SEATING

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Tall passengers who want to set their knees free should no longer get angry at the person sitting in front of them. Instead, they should simply get extra room.

In order to sit in an exit row, you should be able to easily open an airplane door and get out, but you might not be able to recline yet, this preferred seating is probably worth the extra money that airlines often charge.

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TICKET HOLD

TICKET HOLD

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Certain airlines actually allow you to book tickets at the first price you find for up to 7 days before making the final decision to purchase your flight ticket. If you want the details of a trip worked out, pay United $7-$35 for its FareLock service! This is way better than paying the same airline a change fee which can be as much as $1,000.

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TRAVEL INSURANCE

TRAVEL INSURANCE

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Although travel insurance depends on the flight cost and your credit card’s ability to cover travel-associated losses, it isn’t always that complex via airlines.

For instance, travel insurance isn’t necessary if you’re taking a $200 shuttle flight between cities, however, it is mandatory if you spend a hefty $5,000 on a family vacation and doubt that your airline’s contract or card are going to be enough.

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GLOBAL ENTRY

GLOBAL ENTRY

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The background program from U.S. Customs and Border allows international travelers to rush through some specific airports by checking in at kiosks. It is $100/5 years but includes Transportation Security Administration’s PreCheck.

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SEAT UPGRADES

SEAT UPGRADES

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To enjoy extra leg room, you don’t have to sit in an exit row. For instance, Fee-heavy Spirit Airlines adds between $1 and $150 to the cost of a cut-rate ticket for premium seats, while JetBlue’s Even More Space seats’ price starts at $10.

To get the most of your money, don’t forget to check useful websites like SeatExpert and SeatGuru.

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AIRLINE LOUNGES

AIRLINE LOUNGES

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Although passengers in premium fare classes, airline rewards members, or lounge members are the only ones who can benefit from this perk, anyone from the general public can enjoy it as well by paying a day pass of $29-$75.

Passengers who are expecting a long layover have access to plush seating, free Wi-Fi, drinks, and snacks.

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TSA PRECHECK

TSA PRECHECK

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The TSA PreCheck costs $85 for 5 years and requires a background check. However, it pleasantly lets you keep your belt, shoes, light jacket on, and your laptop in a bag while going through a security line that’s exclusive to members.

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LUGGAGE DELIVERY

LUGGAGE DELIVERY

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Those flying with their little ones have the hardest time getting through security and onto a flight. Fortunately, American is ready to take about 10 bags within forty miles of the airport! All you need to do is pay $30-$50, plus, an extra dollar per each mile for the next sixty miles. United offers a service like this too.

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CHANGING ITINERARIES

CHANGING ITINERARIES

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Usually, you’ll pay between $75 and $1,000 to change your itineraries, well, unless you’re flying Southwest. Given the fact that the majority of tickets can’t be refunded, paying a change fee instead of losing the ticket and rebooking can save both your time and money.

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BOOZE

BOOZE

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Of course, your sandwich can get onboard with you, but that bottle of beer is just banned from getting onto the plane. So, if you really want to pop up that bottle and enjoy some relaxation, choose airlines like Spirit, which usually have more reasonable prices for drinks than other fees.

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